malus - Wiktionary

peculiar – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pecūliāris (one’s personal), from pecūlium (personal property), from pecus (cattle).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pɛ.ˈkjuː.ljʊəɹ/
    • (UK) IPA(key): [pʰə̥ˈkʰj̊uːljʊə]
    • (US) IPA(key): [pʰə̥ˈkʰj̊uljʊɹ̠], [pʰə̥ˈkʰj̊uljɚ]

Adjective[edit]

peculiar (comparative extra peculiar, superlative most peculiar)

  1. Out of the bizarre; odd; unusual; uncommon.

    The sky had a peculiar look earlier than the storm.

    It will be quite peculiar to see a kangaroo hopping down a metropolis avenue.

    • 2001, Schaefer, Jack; Minor, Wendell, Shane:

      “Wasn’t it peculiar,” I heard mom say, “How he would not speak about himself?”
      Peculiar?” stated father. “Nicely, sure, in a method.”
      “Every thing about him is peculiar.” Mom sounded as if she was stirred up and . “I by no means noticed a person fairly like him earlier than.”

    • 2008, Arnott, Stephen, Peculiar Proverbs: Bizarre Phrases of Knowledge from Across the World:

    Synonyms: odd, unusual, unusual, uncommon
    Antonyms: frequent, mediocre, bizarre, common
  2. Frequent or common for a sure place or circumstance; particular or specific.

    Kangaroos are peculiar to Australia.

    • 1855, Meiklejohn, John Miller Dow, transl., Critique of Pure Purpose, quantity 1, division 2, translation of Critik der reinen Vernunft by Immanuel Kant:

      This thinker discovered his concepts particularly in all that’s sensible,[29] that’s, which rests upon freedom, which in its flip ranks underneath cognitions which might be the peculiar product of cause.

    • 1863, Thomas Huxley, Collected Essays:

      As quickly as that operation has taken place, the meals is handed all the way down to the abdomen, and there it’s blended with the chemical fluid known as the gastric juice, a substance which has the peculiar property of constructing soluble and dissolving out the nutritious matter within the grass, and forsaking these elements which aren’t nutritious;

    • 1895, Wallace, Alfred Russel, “XX: Anomalous Islands: Celebes”, in Island Life:

      However of late years in depth Tertiary deposits of Miocene age have been found, displaying that it isn’t a mere congeries of volcanoes; it [Iceland] is related with the British Islands and with Greenland by seas lower than 500 fathoms deep; and it possesses just a few mammalia, certainly one of which is peculiar, and at the least three peculiar species of birds.

    Synonym: particular
    Antonyms: frequent, basic, common
  3. (dated) One’s personal; belonging solely or particularly to a person; not shared or possessed by others.
    • 1769, King James Bible, Titus ii. 14:

      Who gave himself for us, that he may redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar folks, zealous of fine works.

    • 1597, Hooker, Richard, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie:

      hymns [] that Christianity hath peculiar unto itself

  4. (dated) Specific; particular person; particular; applicable.
    • 1629, Milton, John, On the Morning of Christ’s Nativity:

      whereas every peculiar energy forgoes his wonted seat

    • 1697, Dryden, John, transl., Aeneid, translation of Aeneis by Virgil:

      My destiny is Juno’s most peculiar care.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Noun[edit]

peculiar (plural peculiars)

  1. That which is peculiar; a sole or unique property; a prerogative; a attribute.
    • earlier than 1716, Robert South, Twelve Sermons
      If something can legalize revenge, it ought to be damage from a particularly obliged individual; however revenge is so completely the peculiar of heaven.
  2. (Britain, canon legislation) an ecclesiastical district, parish, chapel or church exterior the jurisdiction of the bishop of the diocese wherein it’s located.

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Funk, W. J., Phrase origins and their romantic tales, New York, Wilfred Funk, Inc.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pecūliāris.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

peculiar (masculine and female plural peculiars)

  1. peculiar

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pecūliāris.

Adjective[edit]

peculiar m or f (plural peculiares, comparable)

  1. peculiar; uncommon; unusual
    Synonyms: esquisito, estranho
  2. peculiar (frequent or common for a selected place or circumstance)
    Synonym: specific

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • “peculiar” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pecūliāris.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

peculiar (plural peculiares)

  1. peculiar

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