flag - Wiktionary

flag – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Commons

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English flag, flagge (flag), additional etymology unsure. Maybe from or associated to early Center English flage (title for a child’s garment) and Outdated English flagg, flacg (cataplasm, poultice, plaster). Or, maybe finally imitative, or in any other case drawn from Proto-Germanic *flaką (one thing flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain), referring to the form.[1]

Germanic cognates embrace Saterland Frisian Flaage (flag), West Frisian flagge (flag), Dutch vlag (flag), German Flagge (flag), Swedish flagg (flag), Danish flag (flag, ship’s flag). Evaluate additionally Center English flacken (to flutter, palpitate), Swedish dialectal flage (to flutter within the wind), Outdated Norse flögra (to flap about). Akin to Outdated Excessive German flogarōn (to flutter), Outdated Excessive German flogezen (to flutter, flicker), Center English flakeren (to maneuver shortly back and forth), Outdated English flacor (fluttering, flying). Extra at flack, flacker.

Noun[edit]

flag (countable and uncountable, plural flags)

  1. A chunk of fabric, typically embellished with an emblem, used as a visible sign or image.
  2. An actual illustration of a flag (for instance: a digital one utilized in web sites).
  3. (nautical) A flag flown by a ship to point out the presence on board of the admiral; the admiral himself, or his flagship.
  4. (nautical, typically used attributively) A sign flag.
  5. The usage of a flag, particularly to point the beginning of a race or different occasion.
  6. (laptop science) A variable or reminiscence location that shops a true-or-false, yes-or-no worth, sometimes both recording the truth that a sure occasion has occurred or requesting {that a} sure elective motion happen.
  7. (laptop science) In a command line interface, a command parameter requesting elective conduct or in any other case modifying the motion of the command being invoked.
  8. (aviation) A mechanical indicator that pops up to attract the pilot’s consideration to an issue or malfunction.
    • 1966, Barry J. Schiff, All about Flying: An Introduction to the World of Flying (web page 72)
      I used to be taking pictures an IFR method down the San Francisco slot, when abruptly the ILS flag popped up.
    • 1980, Paul Garrison, Flying VFR in marginal climate (web page 139)
      [] after which the OFF flag popped up and the needle went lifeless.
  9. (Britain, uncountable) The sport of seize the flag.
  10. (geometry) A sequence of faces of a given polytope, considered one of every dimension as much as that of the polytope (formally, although in observe not at all times explicitly, together with the null face and the polytope itself), such that every face within the sequence is a part of the next-higher dimension face.
    • 1994, John Ratcliffe, Foundations of Hyperbolic Manifolds[1], web page 230:

      A flag of P is a sequence (F0, F1, …, Fm) of faces of P such that dim Fi = i for every i and Fi is a facet of Fi+1 for every i < m. [] A common polytope in X is a polytope P in X whose group of symmetries in <P> acts transitively on its flags.

    • 2002, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Summary Common Polytopes, Encyclopedia of Arithmetic and Its Purposes 92, web page 31,
      We name P (combinatorially) common if its automorphism group Γ(P) is transitive on its flags.
    • 2006, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Common and Chiral Polytopes in Low Dimensions, Harold Scott Macdonald Coxeter, Chandler Davis, Erich W. Ellers (editors), The Coxeter Legacy: Reflections and Projections, web page 91,
      Roughly talking, chiral polytopes have half as many doable automorphisms as have common polytopes. Extra technically, the n-polytope P is chiral if it has two orbits of flags beneath its group Γ(P), with adjoining flags in numerous orbits.
  11. (arithmetic, linear algebra) A sequence of subspaces of a vector house, starting with the null house and ending with the vector house itself, such that every member of the sequence (till the final) is a correct subspace of the following.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (laptop science: true-or-false worth): Boolean
  • (laptop science: CLI notation): change, possibility
  • (geometry: sequence of faces of a polytope): dart
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Verb[edit]

flag (third-person singular easy current flags, current participle flagging, easy previous and previous participle flagged)

  1. To furnish or deck out with flags.
  2. To mark with a flag, particularly to point the significance of one thing.
    • 2011 January 8, Chris Bevan, “Arsenal 1 – 1 Leeds”, in BBC[2]:

      Walcott was, briefly, awarded a penalty when he was upended within the field however referee Phil Dowd reversed his choice as a result of Bendtner had been flagged offside.

  3. (typically with down) To sign to, particularly to cease a passing car and so on.
    Please flag down a taxi for me.
  4. To convey (a message) by the use of flag alerts.
    to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance
  5. (typically with up) To notice, mark or level out for consideration.
    I’ve flagged up the necessity for additional investigation into this.
    Customers of the Web discussion board can flag others’ posts as inappropriate.
  6. (computing) To sign (an occasion).
    The compiler flagged three errors.
  7. (computing) To set a program variable to true.
    Flag the debug possibility earlier than operating this system.
  8. To decoy (sport) by waving a flag, handkerchief, and so on. to arouse the animal’s curiosity.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Searching Journeys of a Ranchman
      This methodology of searching, nonetheless, is just not a lot practised now as previously, because the antelope are getting frequently shyer and tougher to flag.
  9. (sports activities) To penalize for an infraction.

    The defender was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct.

  10. (chess) To defeat (an opponent) on time, particularly in a blitz sport.
  11. (firearms) To level the muzzle of a firearm at an individual or object one doesn’t intend to fireplace on.
Translations[edit]

See additionally[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Maybe from a variant of flack (to hold free), from Center English flacken; or maybe from Outdated Norse.[1]. Evaluate Center Dutch flaggheren, vlaggheren (to droop, flag).

Verb[edit]

flag (third-person singular easy current flags, current participle flagging, easy previous and previous participle flagged)

  1. (intransitive) To weaken, turn out to be feeble.
    His energy flagged towards the top of the race.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 2
      He now sees a spirit has been raised in opposition to him, and he solely watches until it start to flag.
    • 2012 December 29, Paul Doyle, “Arsenal’s Theo Walcott hits hat-trick in thrilling victory over Newcastle”, in The Guardian[3]:

      The perimeters took it in turns to err and excite earlier than Newcastle flagged and Arsenal signalled their top-four credentials by blowing the guests away.
  2. To hold free with out stiffness; to bend down, as versatile our bodies; to be free, yielding, limp.
  3. To let droop; to endure to fall, or let fall, into feebleness.
    to flag the wings
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Previous to this entry?)
  4. To enervate; to exhaust the vigour or elasticity of.
    • 1670, John Eachard, The Floor and Events of the Contempt of the Clergy
      there may be nothing that flags the Spirits, problems the Blood, and enfeebles the entire Physique of Man, as intense Research.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Of unsure origin, maybe from North Germanic; evaluate Danish flæg (yellow iris). Or, presumably from sense 1, referring to its movement within the wind. Evaluate additionally Dutch vlag.

Noun[edit]

flag (plural flags)

  1. Any of varied vegetation with sword-shaped leaves, particularly irises; particularly, Iris pseudacorus.
    • ca. 1607, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act I, sc. 3:
      [T]he ebbed man, ne’er liked until ne’er value love,
      Comes deared by being lacked. This frequent physique,
      Prefer to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
      Goes to and again, lackeying the various tide,
      To rot itself with movement.
    • 1611, King James Model, Job 8:11:
      Can the push develop up with out mire? can the flag develop with out water?
    • earlier than 1899, Robert Seymour Bridges, There’s a Hill:
      And laden barges float
      By banks of myosote;
      And scented flag and golden flower-de-lys
      Delay the loitering boat.
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Most likely of Scandinavian/North Germanic origin; evaluate Icelandic flag.

Noun[edit]

flag (plural flags)

  1. (out of date besides in dialects) A slice of turf; a sod.
  2. A slab of stone; a flagstone, a flat piece of stone used for paving.
  3. (geology) Any exhausting, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers appropriate for flagstones.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

flag (third-person singular easy current flags, current participle flagging, easy previous and previous participle flagged)

  1. (transitive) To pave with flagstones.
    Fred is planning to flag his patio this weekend.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

flag (plural flags)

  1. A bunch of feathers on the decrease a part of the legs of sure hawks, owls, and so on.
  2. A bunch of elongated wing feathers in sure hawks.
  3. The fuzzy tail of a canine akin to a setter.
  4. (music) A hook connected to the stem of a written notice that assigns its rhythmic worth

References[edit]

  1. 1.01.1 “flag” in Douglas Harper, On-line Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2021.

Chinese language[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese フラグ, from English flag.

Definitions[edit]

flag

  1. (Web slang) A plot or phrases of a personality in an animation, and so on., that might normally result in a selected final result or occasion, not logically or causally, however as a sample of the animation, and so on., for instance the phrases like “I’ll cease doing evil after this one final job” from a personality, who normally wouldn’t survive the “job”. Additionally figurative.
    死亡flag  ―  sǐwáng flag  ―  the phrases of a personality which, as a sample, normally follows the character’s demise
  2. purpose; decision; assertion of intent
    新年flag  ―  xīnnián flag  ―  New Yr resolutions
    flag  ―  flag  ―  to arrange a purpose
    他的flag倒了。  ―  Tāde flag dǎole.  ―  He did not obtain the purpose.
    • 很多同學立了flag要好好備考,然而好的學習方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, trad.]
      很多同学立了flag要好好备考,然而好的学习方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, “雅思中国网” (username), Weibo publish
      Hěnduō tóngxué lìle flag yào hǎohǎo bèikǎo, rán’ér hǎode xuéxí fāngfǎ néng qǐdào shìbàngōngbèi de xiàoguǒ. [Pinyin]
      Many college students said there decision to check exhausting for the check, and a great way to check can yield twice the outcome with half the hassle.
    • “這輩子不打工”的flag就先擱置吧。 [MSC, trad.]
      “这辈子不打工”的flag就先搁置吧。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, The Beijing Information, “Web Movie star Theif to be Launched: Put Apart For Now the Decision to “Not Get Employed Without end””
      “zhè bèizǐ bù dǎgōng” de flag jiù xiān gēzhì ba. [Pinyin]
      Put apart for now the decision to “not get employed ceaselessly”.

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch or English flag

Noun[edit]

flag n (singular particular flaget, plural indefinite flag)

  1. flag (fabric)
  2. flag (true-false variable)

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

flag

  1. crucial of flage

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English flag.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flag m (plural flags, diminutive flagje n)

  1. (computing) flag

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Norse flag, flaga, in all probability from Proto-Germanic *flaką (one thing flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain). Nevertheless, evaluate Proto-Germanic *plaggą.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flag n (genitive singular flags, nominative plural flög)

  1. space of floor stripped of turf

Declension[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “flag” in Douglas Harper, On-line Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2021.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English flag.

Noun[edit]

flag m or f (in variation) (plural flags)

  1. (programming) flag (true-or-false variable)
    Synonym: booleano

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