Plor neg P

do – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English don, from Previous English dōn, from Proto-West Germanic *dōn, from Proto-Germanic *dōną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to place, place, do, make).

The previous tense kind is from Center English didde, dude, from Previous English dyde, *diede, from Proto-Germanic *dedǭ/*dedē, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰédʰeh₁ti, an athematic e-reduplicated verb of the identical root *dʰeh₁-.

Using do in interrogative, unfavorable, and, previously, affirmative sentences, uncommon in Germanic languages, is believed by some linguists to be a Brittonicism, calqued from Brythonic.[1] It’s first recorded in Center English, the place it might have marked the perfective facet, although in some circumstances the that means appears to be imperfective. In Early Fashionable English, any that means in such contexts was misplaced, making it a dummy auxiliary, and shortly thereafter its use turned obligatory in most questions and negation.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

do (third-person singular easy current does, current participle doing, easy previous did, previous participle finished)

  1. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker.
    1. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker in a query whose major verb will not be one other auxiliary verb or be.

      Do you go there usually?

    2. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker in negations with the indicative and crucial moods.
      • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter IV, in The Celeb: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Firm; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698, web page 51:

        “Nicely,” I answered, at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to steer your cotillon, should you consider having one.” ¶ “So that you do not dance, Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I used to be considerably set again by her perspicuity.

      I do not go there usually.

      Do not take heed to him.

    3. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker for emphasis with the indicative, crucial, and subjunctive moods.
      • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt’s Sufferers:

        “I do not know the way you and the ‘head,’ as you name him, will get on, however I do know that should you name my duds a ‘livery’ once more there will be bother. It is dangerous sufficient to go round togged out like a life saver on a drill day, however I can stand that ‘trigger I am paid for it. […]”

      However I do go typically.

      Do inform us.

      It is necessary that he do come see me.

    4. (pro-verb) A syntactic marker that refers again to an earlier verb and permits the speaker to keep away from repeating the verb; in most dialects, not used with auxiliaries akin to be, although it may be in AAVE.

      I play tennis; she does too.

      They do not assume it be like it’s, nevertheless it do.

  2. (transitive) To carry out; to execute.
    Synonyms: accomplish, perform, functionate
    • 2013 June 21, Oliver Burkeman, “The tao of tech”, in The Guardian Weekly, quantity 189, quantity 2, web page 48:

      The soiled secret of the web is that every one this distraction and interruption is immensely worthwhile. Net firms prefer to boast about […], or providing companies that allow you to “keep updated with what your mates are doing“, [] and so forth. However the true approach to construct a profitable on-line enterprise is to be higher than your rivals at undermining folks’s management of their very own consideration.

    All you ever do is surf the Web. What is going to you do this afternoon?

  3. (out of date, transitive) To trigger, make (somebody) (do one thing).
    • 1490, Caxton, William, “Prologue”, in Eneydos; republished as Caxton’s Eneydos, London: Early English Textual content Society, 1890, web page 2:

      And in addition my lord abbot of westmynster ded do shewe to me late, certayn euydences wryton in olde englysshe []

    • 1590, Spenser, Edmund, The Faerie Queene, ebook 2, canto 6:

      Generally to doe him chortle, she would assay / To chortle at shaking of the leaues mild, / Or to behold the water worke []

    • a depraved illness reignd emongst males, that many did to die
  4. (intransitive, transitive) To suffice.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter IV, in The Celeb: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Firm; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698, web page 51:

      “Nicely,” I answered, at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to steer your cotillon, should you consider having one.” ¶ “So you don’t dance, Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I used to be considerably set again by her perspicuity.

    • 1922, Williams, Margery, The Velveteen Rabbit:

      “Right here,” she mentioned, “take your outdated Bunny! He’ll do to sleep with you!” And she or he dragged the Rabbit out by one ear, and put him into the Boy’s arms.

    it’s not the most effective broom, nevertheless it must do;  this can do me, thanks.

  5. (intransitive) To be cheap or acceptable.

    It merely is not going to do to have dozens of kids working round such a quiet occasion.

  6. (ditransitive) To have (as an impact).

    The recent air did him some good.

  7. (intransitive) To fare, carry out (properly or poorly).
    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, in The Economist, quantity 408, quantity 8845:

      Plastics are energy-rich substances, which is why a lot of them burn so readily. Any organism that might unlock and use that vitality would do properly within the Anthropocene. Terrestrial micro organism and fungi which may handle this trick are already acquainted to specialists within the area.

    Our relationship is not doing very properly;  how do you do?

  8. (transitive, mainly in questions) To have as one’s job.

    What does Bob do? — He is a plumber.

  9. To carry out the duties or actions related to (one thing).

    “Remember to do your report” means one thing fairly completely different relying on whether or not you are a scholar or a programmer.

  10. To cook dinner.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cook dinner
    • 1944, Information from the Suburbsbooks?id=VgMIAQAAIAAJ:

      We went down beneath, and the galley-slave did some ham and eggs, and the primary lieutenant, who was aged 19, advised me about Sicily, and time went like a flash.

    • 2005, Alan Tansley, The Grease Monkey, web page 99:

      Subsequent morning, they woke about ten o’clock, Kev, went for a bathe whereas Alice, did some toast, put the kettle on, and when he got here out, she went in.

    I am going to simply do some eggs.

  11. (transitive) To journey in, to tour, to make a circuit of.
    • 1869, Louisa M[ay] Alcott, “Our Overseas Correspondent”, in Little Girls: Or, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, half second, Boston, Mass.: Roberts Brothers, OCLC 30743985, web page 115:

      We ‘did‘ London to our hearts’ content material,—because of Fred and Frank,—and had been sorry to go away; []

    • 1892, James Batchelder, Multum in Parvo: Notes from the Life and Travels of James Batchelder[3], web page 97:

      After doing Paris and its suburbs, I began for London []

    • 1968, July 22, “Ralph Schoenstein”, in Good Place to Go to[4], web page 28:

      No vacationer can get credit score for seeing America first with out doing New York, the Fantastic City, the Baghdad-on-Hudson, the dream within the eye of the Kansas hooker []

    Let’s do New York additionally.

  12. (transitive) To deal with in a sure method.
    • 1894, (Please present the ebook title or journal identify)[5], quantity 87, web page 59:

      They did me properly, I guarantee you — unusual properly: Bellinger of ’84; inexperienced chartreuse match for a prince; []

    • 1928, Sayers, Dorothy L[eigh], “The Abominable Historical past of the Man with Copper Fingers”, in Lord Peter Views the Physique:

      Upon my phrase, though he [my host] definitely did me uncommonly properly, I started to really feel I might be extra comfortable among the many bushmen.

    • 1994, Jervey Tervalon, Perceive This[6], →ISBN, web page 50:

      “Why you gonna do me like that?” I ask. “Do what?” “Canine me.”

  13. (transitive) To work for or on, by the use of caring for, taking care of, getting ready, cleansing, holding so as, and many others.
    • 2018, Kate Atkinson, Transcription, →ISBN, web page 291:

      The lady-who-did didn’t do very properly, Juliet thought.

  14. (intransitive, out of date) To behave or behave in a sure method; to conduct oneself.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Model), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, 2 Kings 17:34:

      Unto today they do after the previous manners: they worry not the Lord, neither do they after their statutes, or after their ordinances, or after the regulation and commandment which the Lord commanded the youngsters of Jacob, whom he named Israel

  15. (transitive) To spend (time) in jail. (See additionally do time)
    Synonym: serve

    I did 5 years for armed theft.

  16. (transitive) To impersonate or depict.
    Synonyms: imitate, personate, take off

    They actually laughed when he did Clinton, with an ideal accent and a leer.

  17. (with ‘a’ and the identify of an individual, place, occasion, and many others.) To repeat or emulate the actions or behaviour that’s related to the individual or factor talked about.
    He did a Henry VIII and received married six occasions.
    He was planning to do a 9/11.
  18. (transitive, slang) To kill.
    Synonyms: do in, homicide, off, rub out; see additionally Thesaurus:kill
    • 2004, Patrick Stevens, Politics Is the Best Recreation: A Johannesburg Liberal Lampoon[7], →ISBN, web page 314:

      He is gonna do me, Jarvis. I child you not, this time he is gonna do me correct.

    • 2007, E.J. Churchill, The Lazarus Code, web page 153:

      The order got here and I did him proper there. The bullet went proper the place it was speculated to go.

  19. (transitive, slang) To cope with for good and all; to complete up; to undo; to break; to do for.
    • 1870,Charles Reade, Put Your self in His Place
      Generally they lie in wait in these darkish streets, and fracture his cranium, [] or break his arm, or lower the sinew of his wrist; and that they name doing him.
  20. (casual) To punish for a misdemeanor.

    He received finished for rushing.

    Instructor’ll do you for that!

  21. (transitive, slang) To have intercourse with. (See additionally do it)
    Synonyms: go to mattress with, sleep with; see additionally Thesaurus:copulate with
    • 1996, James Russell Kincaid, My Secret Life, web page 81:

      [] in the future I did her on the kitchen desk, and several other occasions on the dining-room desk.

    • 2008, On the Line, Donna Hill[8], web page 84:

      The uninhibited lady inside needed to do him proper there on the countertop, however I remained composed.

  22. (transitive) To cheat or swindle.
    Synonyms: defraud, diddle, mug off, rip off, rip-off; see additionally Thesaurus:deceive

    That man simply did me out of 2 hundred bucks!

    • 1852, Thomas De Quincey, Sir William Hamilton
      He was to not be finished, at his time of life, by frivolous provides of a compromise that may have secured him seventy-five per cent.
  23. (transitive) To transform right into a sure kind; particularly, to translate.

    the novel has simply been finished into English;  I’ll do this play right into a film

  24. (transitive, intransitive) To complete.
  25. (Britain, dated, intransitive) To work as a home servant (with for).
    Synonyms: attend, serve, wait on; see additionally Thesaurus:serve
    • 1915, Frank Thomas Bullen, Recollections:

      I’ve left my key in my workplace in Manchester, my household are at Bournemouth, and the outdated lady who does for me goes house at 9 o’clock.

  26. (archaic, dialectal, transitive, auxiliary) Used to kind the current progressive of verbs.
    • 1844, Barnes, William, “Evenén within the Village”, in Poems of Rural Life within the Dorset Dialect:

      …An’ the canines do bark, an’ the rooks be a-vled to the elems excessive and darkish, an’ the water do roar at mill.

  27. (inventory change) To money or to advance cash for, as a invoice or word.
  28. (casual, transitive, ditransitive) To make or present.
    Synonyms: furnish, give, provide; see additionally Thesaurus:give

    Do they do haircuts there?

    Might you do me a burger with mayonnaise as an alternative of ketchup?

  29. (casual, transitive) To injure (one’s personal physique half).
    • 2010 April 24, “Given stretchered off with suspected damaged shoulder”, in The Irish Instances[9], retrieved 2015-07-21:

      “Defender Kolo Toure admitted Given can be a loss, however gave his backing to Nielsen. ‘I believe he is finished his shoulder,’ mentioned the Ivorian.”
    • 2014 April 14, Matt Cleary, “What do Australia’s cricketers do on vacation?”, in ESPNcricinfo[10], retrieved 2015-07-21:

      “Watto will spend the whole winter stretching and doing Pilates, and do a hamstring after bending down to select up his petrol cap after dropping it filling his automobile at Caltex Cronulla.”
    • 2014 August 13, Harry Thring, “I knew immediately I might finished my ACL: Otten”, in AFL.com.au[11], retrieved 2015-07-21:

      “‘I knew immediately I might finished my ACL, I heard the sound – it was very loud and some of the boys mentioned they heard it as properly,’ Otten mentioned.”
  30. (transitive) To take medicine.

    I do cocaine.

  31. (transitive, within the kind be doing [somewhere]) To exist with a goal or for a purpose.

    What’s that automobile doing in our swimming pool?

Conjugation[edit]
Utilization notes[edit]
  • In older types of English, when the pronoun thou was in energetic use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative kinds, the verb do had two such kinds: dost, in auxiliary makes use of, and doest, in different makes use of. The previous tense of each kinds is didst.
  • Equally, when the ending -eth was in energetic use for third-person singular current indicative kinds, the shape doth was used as an auxiliary, and the shape doeth was used elsewhere.
Antonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

See do/translations § Verb.

See additionally[edit]

Noun[edit]

do (plural dos)

  1. (colloquial) A celebration, celebration, social operate.
    Synonym: get-together
    We’re having a little bit of a do on Saturday to have a good time my birthday.
    • 2013, Russell Model, Russell Model and the GQ awards: ‘It is wonderful how absurd it appears’ (in The Guardian, 13 September 2013)[12]
      After a load of photographs and what-not, we descend the world’s longest escalator, that are referred to as that whilst they de-escalate, and in we go to the primary discussion board, a excessive ceilinged corridor, stuffed with round cloth-draped, numbered tables, a stage on the entrance, the letters GQ, 12-foot excessive in neon on the again; this apart, although, neon perpetually the moniker of trash, this can be a posh do, in an opera home full of people in tuxes.
  2. (casual) A hairdo.
    • 2012, Hannah Richell, The Secrets and techniques of the Tides, →ISBN, web page 464:

      I like the brand new do.

    Good do!
  3. One thing that may or ought to be finished (often within the phrase dos and don’ts).
  4. (out of date) A deed; an act.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  5. (archaic) Ado; bustle; stir; to-do; A interval of confusion or argument.
    • 1689, John Selden, Desk Discuss
      Quite a lot of do, and an excessive amount of bother.
    Synonym: to-do
  6. (out of date, Britain, slang) A cheat; a swindler.
  7. (out of date, Britain, slang) An act of swindling; a fraud or deception.
Utilization notes[edit]
  • For the plural of the noun, the spelling dos could be appropriate; do’s is commonly used for the sake of legibility, however is typically thought of incorrect. For the get together, the time period often implies a social operate of modest dimension and ritual.
Translations[edit]

See do/translations § Noun.

Etymology 2[edit]

From the identify of musicologist Giovanni Battista Doni, who urged changing the unique ut with an open syllable for ease of singing. First present in Italian.

Different kinds[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do (plural dos)

  1. (music) A syllable utilized in solfège to characterize the primary and eighth tonic of a significant scale.
    Synonym: ut (archaic)
Translations[edit]

See do/translations § Noun.

See additionally[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Brief for ditto.

Adverb[edit]

do (not comparable)

  1. (uncommon) Abbreviation of ditto.[2]

Etymology 4[edit]

Shortening of dozen.

Numeral[edit]

do

  1. The cardinal quantity occurring after el and earlier than do one in a duodecimal system. Written 10, decimal worth 12.

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]

  • do at OneLook Dictionary Search
  1. ^ John McWhorter (2009) , chapter 1, in Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Historical past of English[1], reprint version, United States of America: Penguin, →ISBN, pages 1–7
  2. ^ “The O’Connell Nationwide Statue”, in The Freeman’s Journal[2], Dublin, 23 October 1862, web page 2

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Different kinds[edit]

Verb[edit]

do

  1. second/third-person singular current indicative of dua

Bambara[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do

  1. group

References[edit]


Noun[edit]

do

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Papuan Languages of New Guinea (1986, →ISBN)

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin dōnum (present)

Noun[edit]

do m (plural dons)

  1. present
  2. expertise

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Italian do.

Noun[edit]

do m (plural dos)

  1. (music) do (first word of diatonic scale)

Central Franconian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Excessive German dār (there).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. right here; there; on this or that place

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Excessive German duo (then), variant of do, dō. Evaluate German da, Dutch toen.

Different kinds[edit]

  • du, dunn (southern Moselle Francoinan)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /doː/ (conventional)
  • IPA(key): /dɔː/ (now typically by conflation with etymology 1 underneath commonplace German affect)

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. (Ripuarian, northern Moselle Franconian) then; again then (at a sure time prior to now)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Previous Excessive German du.

Different kinds[edit]

  • du (many dialects)
  • dou (some dialects of Moselle Franconian)
  • de (unstressed kind)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

do

  1. (few dialects, together with Kölsch) thou; you (singular)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

do + genitive

  1. into, in (to the within of)

    Vešel do místnosti.He walked into the room.

    Dostala se jí voda do bot.Water received in her boots.

  2. to, in (within the path of, and arriving at; indicating vacation spot)

    Jdeme do obchodu.We’re strolling to the store.

    Přiletěli jsme do New Yorku.We arrived in New York.

  3. till (as much as the time of)

    Zůstal tam až do neděle.He stayed there till Sunday.

  4. by (at a while earlier than the given time)

    Ať jsi zpátky do desíti!Be again by ten o’clock!

Additional studying[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Italian do (the word).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do m or f (plural do’s)

  1. do, the musical word
  2. (Belgium) C, the musical word

Synonyms[edit]

See additionally[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

do (accusative singular do-on, plural do-oj, accusative plural do-ojn)

  1. The identify of the Latin-script letter D.

See additionally[edit]

  • (Latin-script letter names) litero; a, bo, co, ĉo, do, e, fo, go, ĝo, ho, ĥo, i, jo, ĵo, ko, lo, mo, no, o, po, ro, so, ŝo, to, u, ŭo, vo, zo

Etymology 2[edit]

From French donc.

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. subsequently, then, so (with conclusion), certainly, nevertheless

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Portuguese do, from de + o.

Preposition[edit]

do m (plural dos, female da, female plural das)

  1. contraction of de o (of the).
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 1: Lengua Española:

      I si “a patria do homi é sua lengua”, cumu idía Albert Camus, o que está claru é que a lengua está mui por encima de fronteiras, serras, rius i maris, de situaciós pulíticas i sociu-económicas, de lazus religiosus e inclusu familiaris.

      And if “a person’s homeland [i.e. “homeland of the man”] is his language”, as Albert Camus mentioned, what is evident is that language is above borders, mountain ranges, rivers and seas, above political and socio-economic conditions, of non secular and even household ties.

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do n (genitive singular dos, plural do)

  1. (music) do

Declension[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do m (plural do)

  1. (music) do, the word ‘C’.
    Synonym: ut

Additional studying[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From contraction of preposition de (of, from) + masculine particular article o (the)

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

do m (female da, masculine plural dos, female plural das)

  1. of the; from the; ‘s

    cabalo do demodemon’s horse (“dragonfly”)


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dos (again)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do

  1. again (of the physique)

Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. right here
    Synonyms: hie, hier

    Die Fraa is nimmi do.The lady is not right here anymore.

  2. then; so
    Synonym: dann

    Do sim-mer fortgesprung.Then we fled.

Additional studying[edit]


Adverb[edit]

do

  1. so, subsequently

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center Irish ro-, from Previous Irish ro-, from Proto-Celtic *ɸro-.

Different kinds[edit]

  • d’ (used earlier than vowels and lenited fh-)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠɔ/, /d̪ˠə/

Particle[edit]

do (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster, literary) prefixed earlier than the preterite, imperfect and conditional types of a verb

    do mhol séhe praised

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably associated to the usage of go in place a because the direct relative particle, influenced by Etymology 1.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠɔ/, /d̪ˠə/

Particle[edit]

do (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster, literary) relative marker (nominative, accusative)

    an cailín do mholann séthe lady that he praises

Etymology 3[edit]

From Previous Irish do, from Proto-Celtic *do (to, for).

Different kinds[edit]

  • d’ (used earlier than vowel sounds)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠɔ/, /d̪ˠə/
  • (Connacht) IPA(key): /ɡə/ (as if spelled go; do and go (to, as much as, till) have largely turn out to be conflated on this dialect)

Preposition[edit]

do (plus dative, triggers lenition)

  1. to, for

    do charato a pal, for a pal

  2. used with the possessive determiners mo, do, bhur to point the direct object of a verbal noun, rather than ag after a type of within the progressive facet

    Tá sé do mo ghortú.It’s hurting me.

    Bhí sé do d’fhiafraí.He was inquiring about you sg.
    Bhí sibh do bhur gcloí.You pl had been being overthrown.
Inflection[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Previous Irish do, from Proto-Celtic *tu (your, thy).

Different kinds[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

do (triggers lenition)

  1. your (singular)

    Cá bhfuil do charr?The place is your automobile?

See additionally[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “do”, in eDIL: Digital Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • “do” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “do” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “do” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Different kinds[edit]

Verb[edit]

do

  1. first-person singular indicative current of dare

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

do m

  1. do (musical word)
  2. C (musical word or key)

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

do

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Preposition[edit]

do

  1. behind
    Antonym: dant
  2. earlier than (time)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *didō, from Proto-Indo-European *dédeh₃ti, from the basis *deh₃- (give). The reduplication was misplaced in Latin within the current tense, however is preserved within the different Italic languages. A root aorist (from Proto-Indo-European *déh₃t) is preserved in Venetic 𐌆𐌏𐌕𐌏 (doto); the opposite Italic good kinds mirror a reduplicated stative, *dedai. Nevertheless, the basis aorist probably served because the supply of the Latin current kinds.[1]

Cognates embody Historic Greek δίδωμι (dídōmi), Sanskrit ददाति (dádāti), Previous Persian 𐎭𐎭𐎠𐎬𐎢𐎺 (dā-).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

(current infinitive dare, good energetic dedī, supine datum); first conjugation, irregular

  1. I give
    Synonym: dōnō
    Tertium non datur.regulation of excluded center

    A 3rd [possibility] will not be given:
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Exodus.20.12:

      Honora patrem tuum et matrem tuam, ut sis longaevus tremendous terram, quam Dominus Deus tuus dabit tibi.

      Honour thy father and thy mom: that thy days could also be lengthy upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.
  2. I supply, render
    Synonym: dōnō
    • c. 200 BC, Plautus Captivi (“the captives”) (English and Latin textual content)
      Do tibi operam, Aristophontes, si quid est quod me velis.

      I’m at your service, Aristophontes, if there’s something you need of me. (“I supply labour to you, Aristophontes…)
  3. I yield, give up, concede
  4. I adduce (e.g., a witness)

Conjugation[edit]

The passive may be seen as “to obtain”. For instance, “Dor ūnum flōrem te,” would imply, “I obtain (I’m given) a flower from you.”

Derived phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the opposite Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Collection; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Ligurian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

do

  1. Contraction of de o.; of the (masculine singular)

Decrease Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

do (with genitive)

  1. to, into
    • 1998, Erwin Hannusch, Niedersorbisch praktisch und verständlich, Bauzten: Domowina, →ISBN, p. 30:
      Jana chójźi hyšći do šule, wóna jo wuknica.

      Jana nonetheless goes to high school; she is a schoolgirl.

    do Chóśebuzato Cottbus

    do jsyto the village, into the village

    do wognjainto the hearth

    do njebjato heaven

Additional studying[edit]

  • do in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • do in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þar.

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. there, in that place

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

do

  1. second-person singular crucial of doen

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably an abbreviation of “do-hūs” (“do home”) from Center Low German dōn.

Noun[edit]

do m or n (particular singular doen or doet, indefinite plural doer or do, particular plural doene or doa)

  1. a bathroom, a toilet
    Synonyms: dass, toalett
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

do m

  1. do (the musical word)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably an abbreviation of “do-hūs” (“do home”) from Center Low German dōn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do m or n (particular singular doen or doet, indefinite plural doar or do, particular plural doane or doa)

  1. a bathroom, a toilet
    Synonyms: dass, toalett

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Norse þó.

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. anyhow, nonetheless, however
Derived phrases[edit]

For different phrases please discuss with do (Bokmål) in the meanwhile.

Etymology 3[edit]

From the identify of musicologist Giovanni Battista Doni, who urged changing the unique ut with an open syllable for ease of singing. First present in Italian.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do m (particular singular do-en, indefinite plural do-ar, particular plural do-ane)

  1. (music) do, a syllable utilized in solfège to characterize the second word of a significant scale.
Coordinate phrases[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

do

  1. (out of date) previous singular of døy

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Previous Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *do (to), from Proto-Indo-European *de. Unrelated to the prefix to-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

do (with dative; triggers lenition of a following consonant-initial noun.)

  1. to, for

Inflection[edit]

Mixtures with a particular article:

Mixtures with a possessive determiner:

  • dom (to/for my)
  • dot (to/in your sg)
  • dia (to/for his/her/their)

Mixtures with a relative pronoun:

  • dia· (to/for whom/which)

Different kinds[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

do

  1. Different spelling of

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. Different spelling of

Additional studying[edit]

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 do”, in eDIL: Digital Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Rudolf Thurneysen (1940, reprinted 2003) D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Previous Irish, Dublin Institute for Superior Research, →ISBN, pages 274, 506

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Evaluate German da.

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. right here
    Heit iss en Feierdaag do in Amerikaa.

    In the present day is a vacation right here in America.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *do, from Proto-Indo-European *de, *do, whence English to.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

do (+ genitive)

  1. to, in direction of, into
  2. till
  3. (with deadline) by

Additional studying[edit]

  • do in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • do in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Different kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Portuguese do, from de (of) + o (the). Akin to Spanish del and French du.

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

do (plural dos, female da, female plural das)

  1. Contraction of de o (pertaining or referring to the); of the; from the (masculine singular)

Quotations[edit]

For quotations utilizing this time period, see Citations:do.

See additionally[edit]

  • da (female kind)
  • dos (plural kind)
  • das (female plural kind)

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See the etymology of the primary entry.

Article[edit]

do

  1. plural of die

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Frisian thā, from Proto-Germanic *þan.

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. then

References[edit]

  • “die” in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch
  • “do” in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Irish do, from Proto-Celtic *tu (your, thy).

Pronoun[edit]

do

  1. your (casual singular)

    Bha iongantach do ghràdh dhomh.Fantastic was thy love for me.

Utilization notes[edit]

  • Lenites the next phrase.
  • Earlier than a phrase starting with a vowel or fh adopted by a vowel it takes the shape d’.

    Bidh cuimhn’ agam ort, air d’ anam ghrinn.I’ll keep in mind thee, thy expensive soul.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Irish do, from Proto-Celtic *tu (to).

Preposition[edit]

do

  1. to

    Bha e a’ siubhal do Shasainn an-uiridh.He travelled to England final yr.

  2. for

    Do dh’ar beatha, dhut, dhèanainn e.For our life, for thee, I’d do it.

Utilization notes[edit]

  • Lenites the next phrase.
  • Earlier than a phrase starting with a vowel or fh adopted by a vowel it takes the shape do dh’.

    Tha sinn a’ dol do dh’Ìle.We’re going to Islay.

  • If the particular article within the singular follows, it combines with do into don:

    Fàilte don dùthaich.Welcome to the nation.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *do, from Proto-Indo-European *de, *do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

(Cyrillic spelling до̏)

  1. solely, besides

    ni(t)ko do jano person however me, solely me

    ne jede ništa do komad hljeba/hlebahe eats nothing besides a bit of bread

  2. round, roughly

    do dva metraround two meters

    do 5 kilaround 5 kilograms

  3. as a result of, due to

    to je do hranethat is because of the meals

Preposition[edit]

(Cyrillic spelling до̏) (+ genitive case)

  1. as much as, to, till, so far as, by

    od Zagreba do Beogradafrom Zagreb to Belgrade

    od jutra do mraka / od 5 do 10 satifrom morning to nighttime / from 5 to 10 o’clock

    od vrha do dnafrom high to backside

    do r(ij)ekeso far as the river

    unhappy je pet do sedamnow it is 5 minutes to seven

    do poned(j)eljkaby Monday

    do sadato this point, to this point, until now

    do nedavnatill not too long ago

    do dana današnjegato this very day

    sve doso far as as much as, all the way in which to

    do kudahow far

    do tudato this point, as much as right here

  2. earlier than (= prȉje/prȅ)

    do rataearlier than the struggle

  3. beside, subsequent (to)

    s(j)edi do menesit subsequent to me

    jedan do drugogaaspect by aspect

  4. (by extension, idiomatic and figurative meanings) as much as one; concerned about; really feel like

    nije mi do togaI do not really feel like doing that

    nije mi do sm(ij)ehaI do not really feel like laughing

    njemu je samo do seksahe’s solely concerned about intercourse

    nije mi puno stalo do togaI am not very a lot concerned about that

    nije do meneit is less than me, it is no me to lame

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dolъ.

Different kinds[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

 m (Cyrillic spelling до̑)

  1. (regional, Bosnia, Serbia) dale, small valley
Declension[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Italian do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

 m (Cyrillic spelling до̑) (indeclinable)

  1. (music) do

References[edit]

  • “do” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • “do” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • “do” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

do (+ genitive)

  1. into, in, to, till

Additional studying[edit]

  • do in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

do

  1. (with genitive) by (a while earlier than the given time)
  2. (with genitive) until

Additional studying[edit]

  • do”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /do/, [d̪o]
  • Hyphenation: do

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Italian do.

Noun[edit]

do m (plural dos)

  1. do (musical word)
  2. C (musical word or key)

See additionally[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From contraction of preposition de (of, from) + adverb o (in the place).

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. (out of date) the place
    Synonym: donde (fashionable)

Pronoun[edit]

do

  1. (out of date) the place
    Synonym: donde (fashionable)
Derived phrases[edit]

Taworta[edit]

Noun[edit]

do

  1. fireplace

Additional studying[edit]

Invoice Palmer, The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Space (→ISBN, 2017), web page 531, desk 95, Comparative fundamental vocabulary in Lakes Plain Languages


Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

do

  1. C (musical word)

Venetian[edit]

Verb[edit]

do

  1. first-person singular current indicative of dar (I give)

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Sino-Vietnamese phrase from .

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

do

  1. (impartial passive voice marker) by
    Hầu hết các mô hình dưỡng lão đều do nhà nước bảo trợ, […]

    A lot of the aged care fashions are sponsored by the state, […]
  2. due to; as a result of

Associated phrases[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

do

  1. although, though, though

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /doː/

Etymology 1[edit]

Adverb[edit]

do

  1. sure
  2. certainly
    Do, es i i’r parc ddoe.

    Sure, I went to the park yesterday.

Utilization notes[edit]

  • Used to specific an affirmative reply to verbs prior to now tense.

Etymology 2[edit]

Different kinds[edit]

Verb[edit]

do

  1. (colloquial) first-person singular way forward for dod

Mutation[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

do

  1. Mushy mutation of to.

Mutation[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Frisian thū, from Proto-West Germanic *þū, from Proto-Germanic *þū, from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

do

  1. (Clay) you; casual second-person singular pronoun

    Ik hâld fan dy.I like you.

Inflection[edit]
Different kinds[edit]
Additional studying[edit]
  • “do (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Frisian *dūve, from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do c (plural dowen, diminutive doke)

  1. pigeon, dove
Additional studying[edit]
  • “do (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Italian do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

do c (plural do’s)

  1. do (musical word)
Additional studying[edit]
  • “do (IV)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology[edit]

Associated to Persian دوغ(duğ) and Tajik дуғ (duġ).

Noun[edit]

do ?

  1. airan

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