malus - Wiktionary

coronal – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English coronal, from Anglo-Norman coronal, from Latin corōnālis (associated to a crown), from corōna (crown).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coronal (comparative extra coronal, superlative most coronal)

  1. Regarding a crown or coronation.
  2. (astronomy) Regarding the corona of a star.
    • 1878, William de Wiveleslie Abney, A Treatise on Pictures
      The coronal gentle throughout the eclipse is faint.
    • 2013 July 28, Megan Gannon, “Spacecraft Sees Big ‘Gap’ Within the Solar”, in information.yahoo.com[1], retrieved 2013-07-29:

      Coronal holes are darker, cooler areas of the solar’s environment, or corona, containing little photo voltaic materials. In these gaps, magnetic area traces whip out into the photo voltaic wind slightly than looping again to the solar’s floor. Coronal holes can have an effect on area climate, as they ship photo voltaic particles streaming off the solar about thrice sooner than the slower wind unleashed elsewhere from the solar’s environment, in line with an outline from NASA.
  3. (botany) Regarding the corona of a flower.
  4. (phonetics) Regarding a sound made with the tip or blade of the tongue.
  5. (anatomy) Regarding the coronal airplane that divides a physique into dorsal (again) and ventral (entrance).
Hyponyms[edit]
Coordinate phrases[edit]
  • (dentistry location adjectives) anterior,‎ apical,‎ apicocoronal,‎ axial,‎ buccal,‎ buccoapical,‎ buccocervical,‎ buccogingival,‎ buccolabial,‎ buccolingual,‎ bucco-occlusal,‎ buccopalatal,‎ cervical,‎ coronal,‎ coronoapical,‎ distal,‎ distoapical,‎ distobuccal,‎ distocervical,‎ distocoronal,‎ distofacial,‎ distogingival,‎ distoincisal,‎ distolingual,‎ disto-occlusal,‎ distoclusal,‎ distocclusal,‎ distopalatal,‎ facial,‎ gingival,‎ incisal,‎ incisocervical,‎ inferior,‎ labial,‎ lingual,‎ linguobuccal,‎ linguo-occlusal,‎ mandibular,‎ maxillary,‎ mesial,‎ mesioapical,‎ mesiobuccal,‎ mesiocervical,‎ mesiocoronal,‎ mesiodistal,‎ mesiofacial,‎ mesioincisal,‎ mesiogingival,‎ mesiolingual,‎ mesio-occlusal,‎ mesioclusal,‎ mesiocclusal,‎ mesiopalatal,‎ occlusal,‎ palatal,‎ posterior,‎ proximal,‎ superior,‎ vestibular (Class: en:Dentistry) [edit]
  • (phonetics): labial, dorsal, radical, laryngeal

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

coronal (plural coronals)

  1. A crown or coronet.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter V, in Le Morte Darthur, e-book V:
      Therfore aryse and dresse the thow gloton / For today shall thou dye of my hand / Thenne the gloton anone starte vp and tooke a grete clubbe in his hand / and smote on the kynge that his coronal fylle to the erthe
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.5:
      That shall embellish extra your beautie vivid, / And crowne your heades with heavenly coronall, / Such because the Angels weare earlier than Gods tribunall!
  2. A wreath or garland of flowers.
    • 1862, Edward McDermott, The Common Information to the Worldwide Exhibition of 1862, Cambridge College Press:

      The bowl is within the Renaissance type, with winged figures supporting coronals and wreaths of flowers, and on the sting is an emblematic determine pouring out water.

    • 1911, George Sterling, Duandon[2]:

      The place, darker for the sky’s unclouded dome, The waves took sudden coronals of froth

  3. The frontal bone, over which the ancients wore their coronae or garlands.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Hooper to this entry?)
    • 1947, Hans Grüneberg, Animal Genetics and Medication, web page 190:

      Oxycephaly outcomes from the fusion of each coronal sutures and of the sagittal suture; trigonocephaly from a fusion of each coronals; []

  4. (phonetics) A consonant produced with the tip or blade of the tongue.
    • 2011, Mirco Ghini, Asymmetries within the Phonology of Miogliola, web page 34:

      This structurally accounts for a variety of phenomena that deal with coronals asymetrically with respect to different locations of articulation.

Translations[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

coronal (plural coronals)

  1. Out of date type of colonel.

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Latin corōnālis, from corōna (a crown).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coronal (female singular coronale, masculine plural coronaux, female plural coronales)

  1. (anatomy, astronomy, botany, phonetics) coronal

Additional studying[edit]


Center English[edit]

Different kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman coronal, from Latin corōnālis; equal to coroune +‎ -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɔruˈnaːl/, /ˈkɔrunal/, /ˈkɔr(ə)nal/, /ˈkruːnal/

Noun[edit]

coronal (plural coronales)

  1. A tiara; a crown missing arches or masking (typically mixed with a helm).
  2. The purpose or high of a rod-shaped object (e.g. a pike or pillar)
  3. (uncommon) A nimbus; the headgear of angels and saints.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coronal m or f (plural coronais, comparable)

  1. (phonetics) coronal (produced with tip or blade of tongue)

Noun[edit]

coronal m (plural coronais)

  1. (phonetics) coronal (consonant produced with tip or blade of tongue)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin coronalis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coronal (plural coronales)

  1. (anatomy) coronal
  2. (phonetics) coronal (regarding a sound produced with the tip or blade of the tongue)

Noun[edit]

coronal f (plural coronales)

  1. (phonetics) coronal (a consonant produced with the tip or blade of the tongue)

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

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