berry - Wiktionary

berry – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Baskets of assorted berries within the widespread sense. Solely blueberries are berries within the botanical sense.

Collage of 4 berries within the botanical sense, to not the identical scale: crimson gooseberries (left), crimson currants (high), a persimmon (backside) and grapes (proper).

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English berye, from Outdated English beriġe, from Proto-West Germanic *baʀi, from Proto-Germanic *bazją.[1]

Cognate with Saterland Frisian Bäie, West Flemish beier, German Beere, Icelandic ber, Danish bær.

The slang sense “police automotive” might come from the lights on the autos’ roofs.[2]

Noun[edit]

berry (plural berries)

  1. A small succulent fruit, of any one in all many sorts.
  2. (botany) A comfortable fruit which develops from a single ovary and comprises seeds not encased in pits.
  3. A espresso bean.
  4. One of many ova or eggs of a fish.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Travis to this entry?)
  5. (slang, US, African-American) A police automotive.
  6. (US, slang, dated) A greenback.
    • 1921, Collier’s (quantity 67, web page 365)
      4 rounds and Enright nonetheless on his ft and 100 and fifty thousand berries gone if he stays two extra!
Utilization notes[edit]

Many fruits generally thought to be berries, equivalent to strawberries and raspberries, aren’t berries within the botanical sense, whereas many fruits that are berries within the botanical sense aren’t thought to be berries in widespread parlance, equivalent to bananas and pumpkins.

Derived phrases[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]
References[edit]
  1. ^ Marlies Philippa et al., eds., Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands, A-Z, s.v. “bes” (Amsterdam UP, Three Dec. 2009) [1].
  2. ^ Jonathon Inexperienced (2018) , “berry, n.1”, in Inexperienced’s Dictionary of Slang[2]

Verb[edit]

berry (third-person singular easy current berries, current participle berrying, easy previous and previous participle berried)

  1. To choose berries.
    On summer season days Grandma used to take us berrying, whether or not we needed to go or not.
    • 1988, Early American Life, web page 35:

      Partly as a result of I all the time itched and prickled in a berry patch I could have been disinclined to nibble as I labored; however largely I believe it was as a result of I berried beneath a grasp strategist and I needed to see how effectively we might coordinate our efforts…

  2. To bear or produce berries.
Utilization notes[edit]
  • Unlikely for use to discuss with business harvesting of berries.
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English berȝe, berghe, from Outdated English beorġe, dative type of beorg (mountain, hill, mound, barrow), from Proto-West Germanic *berg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz (mountain, hill). Extra at barrow.

Various varieties[edit]

Noun[edit]

berry (plural berries)

  1. (now mainly dialectal) A mound; a barrow.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center English bery (a burrow). Extra at burrow.

Noun[edit]

berry (plural berries)

  1. (dialectal) A burrow, particularly a rabbit’s burrow.
  2. An excavation; a navy mine.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Center English beryen, berien, from Outdated English *berian (discovered solely in previous participle ġebered (crushed, kneaded, harassed, oppressed, vexed)), from Proto-Germanic *barjaną (to beat, hit), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to tear, reduce, break up, grate).

Cognate with Scots berry, barry (to thresh, thrash), German beren (to beat, knead), Icelandic berja (to beat), Latin feriō (strike, hit, verb).

Verb[edit]

berry (third-person singular easy current berries, current participle berrying, easy previous and previous participle berried)

  1. (transitive) To beat; give a beating to; thrash.
  2. (transitive) To thresh (grain).

Anagrams[edit]

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